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06 2017

Dining In and Out: The Market

One young foodie explores the local restaurant scene, bringing quality cuisine into your kitchen, sans doggie bag.

By Kaylyn Deiter

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Dining Out

After living in Sioux Falls for nearly four years while going to college, it’s safe to say the city has become my second home. And the restaurant scene a close second to my mom’s kitchen. That’s why I was pleasantly surprised to find a local eatery that I hadn’t visited before: The Market, a restaurant and wine shop located in downtown’s historic Harvester Building.

And boy, was this restaurant one worth sampling. With a gorgeous outdoor patio, extensive wine list and local menu, I’m honestly pretty disappointed not to have discovered The Market sooner. But not to worry, I’m sure this place will soon end up being one of my go-to’s.

Owner Laurel Lanther said the idea for The Market actually came after she decided to take a break from the restaurant business. But luckily for her hungry customers, that break didn’t last.

“We started out at the old location as just a retail market,” Lanther said. “But after awhile people started asking for my food again, so I decided we should move to a bigger place and I got back in the kitchen.”

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(Photo courtesy of tripadvisor.com)

That new space on East Sixth Street opened in 2014, allowing The Market to become what it is today: an eclectic retreat for those who love to eat local. The interior of the eatery is quirky, Italian wine cellar—bottles of endless variety lining the walls, with booths and tables tucked in amidst the milieu. The lighting is dim, and the exposed brick adds coziness, but The Market’s outdoor seating is definitely its selling point.

The roomy wood porch provides ample area for numerous tables, and the overhanging vines and trees make patrons feel like they’re dining in an urban garden. The “Sioux Empire Steel” sign in the background completes the uptown-meets-small-town ambience.

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(Photo courtesy of tripadvisor.com)

But though the atmosphere is enviable, food is what The Market is known for, that and wine. Arrayed on unimposing clipboards, the menu boasts anything from deli sandwiches and fries to flavorful stir fry, roast chicken and hearty mac and cheese. The special of the night?—shark. Yep, the kind of Jaws fame. This particular carnivore was caught off the coast of Hawaii and roasted outside the restaurant in a bed of banana leaves. Impressive, to say the least.

“What we serve is really a product of a group effort,” Lanther said. “Each of our employees is part of planning the menu, and even on our days off there are people in the kitchen trying out something new for our daily specials.”

Dessert was also nothing less than impressive. Our group of three ordered the house cherry pie and The Market’s famous bacon sundae, a delicious mix of butterscotch ice cream, roasted walnuts and candied bacon. My little foodie heart went home happy.

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(Photo courtesy of Kaylyn Deiter)

After their time eating at her restaurant, Lanther said she wants customers to feel that they experienced something new.

“We try to push people’s palettes,” she said. “My favorite thing is when someone comes up to me and says they tried something different and loved it.”

The Market is a restaurant brimming with lovable quirks, from the enthusiastic staff and eclectic specials to the outdoor patio decorated with bucket lights and the history in its walls, this is one dining out experience that will be anything but boring, and nothing less than delicious.

Three reasons to eat at The Market:

  1. Outdoor seating to rival any place in Sioux Falls
  2. Explore the Harvester Building while your food cooks
  3. Desserts made in Heaven

Dining In

Weather not cooperating for a night of eating out on The Market’s patio? Not to worry, we’ve got you covered with a hearty helping of homemade mac and cheese modeled after The Market’s cheesiest staple. All you need is a full glass of wine and you’re set for a night of dining in.

Ingredients:

  • 1 package macaroni noodles
  • 1 cup breadcrumbs
  • Salt and pepper
  • 3 ½ tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 6 tablespoons flour
  • 2 ½ cups milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 ¼ cups grated Monterey Jack cheese
  • 1 ¼ cups grated Cheddar cheese

Instructions:

  1. Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil
  2. Add the macaroni noodles and cook according to package directions
  3. Preheat the broiler to medium
  4. To make the cheese sauce, melt the butter in a saucepan
  5. Stir in the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 1 minute
  6. Pour in the milk in a steady stream, whisking constantly, and continue to whisk for 3-5 minutes until the sauce begins to thicken
  7. Season with salt
  8. Remove from the heat and add the cheeses, mixing well with a spoon to incorporate
  9. Combine the cooked macaroni with the cheese sauce
  10. Transfer the macaroni mixture to a baking dish and spread evenly
  11. Top with pepper and sprinkle evenly with breadcrumbs
  12. Broil for 5-10 minutes or until the top is crunchy and golden brown
  13. Serve immediately

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The Market’s mac is hard to beat, but this simple recipe comes in at a close second. If you want more of a kick, add in a few green onions, otherwise enjoy your cheesy dinner minus the typical box of Kraft.

Three reasons to enjoy The Market at home:

  1. Homemade pasta won’t break the bank
  2. This recipe will replace your Kraft mac & cheese addiction, trust me
  3. You just made a meal out of pasta and wine, what could be better?

The Market has got to be one of my new favorite restaurants in Sioux Falls. It has an atmosphere like no other and food that tops even a night out on the patio. Take the magic of The Market home with this mac and cheese recipe. Guarantee you’ll be wanting seconds.

 

Related:

Dining In and Out: Crawford’s Bar & Grill

Dining In and Out: Crave

Dining In and Out: Oh My Cupcakes

Dining In and Out: Fiero Pizza

Dining In and Out: Phillips Avenue Diner

Dining In and Out: Mama’s Ladas

Dining In and Out: Ode to Food and Drinks

Web Extra: Ode’s Dirty Arnold

Meet the Interns Kaylyn Deiter 

06 2017

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2007

By Sean Calhoun

Here it is, folks – the final installment of The Music Yearbook. I started middle school in 2007, and it was one of the first years where I actually started to pay attention to pop music. “American Idol” was still at the height of its powers, and there was one especially successful album from an alumnus released in 2007…

Daughtry – Daughtry

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There’s no denying Chris Daughtry’s talent – he was a top-five finisher on American Idol’s fifth season, and has become the third-most successful Idol alumnus ever by record sales, behind only Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood. Daughtry was one of the most successful debut rock albums of the 2000s and has been certified quadruple platinum at the time of me writing this review.

I also feel like I should admit that I loved this album when it first came out. One of my mom’s friends had it on CD and let me borrow it, and my sister and I listened to many of the songs dozens of times.

This is kind of embarrassing to think about in retrospect, because Daughtry is not a very good album.

It’s actually not that hard to figure out why the album was so successful – it thrives off of being almost impossibly generic. Daughtry trots out passable imitations of Staind, Nickelback, and just about every other commercially popular but critically maligned mainstream rock band of the last fifteen years. These tracks stuck as radio hits because they were inoffensively bland, easily replayable and lost in the shuffle of dozens of other tracks that sounded almost exactly the same.

There’s a lot of faux emotion here, especially on tracks like “Home” and “What About Now,” as Daughtry contemplates topics covered by plenty of musicians before him – loneliness, wanderlust, unrequited love, not-quite-requited-enough love, and so on. (Really, how many times has “Be careful what you wish for” been a lyric in a rock song now?) They’re the types of tracks that are perfectly suited for vaguely Christian family films and inspirational sports montages (the two places that I would like to believe accounted for most of this album’s sales).

In terms of the music itself, there’s not much to say about the instrumentation. It sounds like everything else to come out of the genre – decently performed and serviceable, yes, but with any possibly edges of uniqueness sanded off. Power chords and 4/4 time signatures abound, and there’s nothing creative here in terms of song structure or melodic experimentation.

There’s really not a lot that’s particularly noteworthy about Daughtry, which made writing this review a somewhat more difficult task than I expected. It’s a boring, safe album that sounds just like six or seven other albums coming around at about the same time. Perhaps it’s telling that this album, now a decade old, is still the most successful thing Chris Daughtry’s ever been a part of.

Score, Adjusted for 2017 Ratings Inflation: 3.8/10

 

Seeing as this is the final Music Yearbook entry, I really wanted to end the series on a positive note after a streak of mediocre-to-decent albums. I found the perfect sendoff in a terrific album from one of the most significant pop-punk bands of the decade…

Infinity On High – Fall Out Boy

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Fall Out Boy was on top of the world in 2007. Their previous album, From Under the Cork Tree, had catapulted them towards mainstream stardom on the strength of singles like “Dance, Dance” and “Sugar, We’re Going Down”, and the hope was that the follow-up could keep the momentum going.

And, by golly, it did more than that. Infinity On High was, to that point, the creative and commercial peak of Fall Out Boy’s career, pushing them even further into the public eye and cementing them as one of the defining bands of their genre.

The opening track, “Thriller,” sets the tone for the album as a whole. It serves as something akin to a rapper’s boast track (and, in fact, Jay-Z provides narration), introducing the band as a confident and flashy force to be reckoned with. From that point on, the album rushes headlong into some of the best pop punk of the entire decade.

Besides being one of the most ridiculously titled songs of all time, “I’m Like a Lawyer with the Way I’m Always Trying to Get You Off (Me & You)” is a fantastic single with a lot of really good instrumental work. “The Take Over, The Breaks Over” is a criminally underrated gem, as is “Golden.” “This Ain’t A Scene, It’s An Arms Race” and “Thnks fr th Mmrs,” the two smash hits from the album, deserved every bit of the attention they received – especially the latter, one of the tightest, sharpest tracks in the band’s entire discography. There is not a single weak track on the album, as Patrick Stump and company take the listener on an immensely enjoyable, musically crisp ride through the entirety of the album’s forty-eight-minute runtime.

Yes, large swaths of the album are heavily pretentious and egotistical, but that’s part of what makes Infinity On High (and pre-hiatus Fall Out Boy as a whole) so unique – they traded in the typical pop-punk trappings of angst and inadequacy for a supremely self-confident bombast, both musically and lyrically, that set them apart from the rest of the scene. Rarely has any band sounded so completely sure of themselves as Fall Out Boy do on this record.

An attitude like this could spell disaster for some bands, but this album comes from a group with the musical and theatrical chops to back up their confidence. Patrick Stump repeatedly outdoes himself vocally, and the rest of the band (with bassist Pete Wentz as perhaps its most crucial anchor) follows suit, turning in career performances on track after track.

Infinity On High is one of my favorite albums of all time, and it’s certainly the best album in Fall Out Boy’s discography (with Folie á Deux coming in a contentious second place). Beyond that, I would rank it among the best pop-punk albums ever. The only drawback is how much worse it makes the totality of the band’s post-hiatus output look.

Score, Adjusted for 2017 Ratings Inflation: 10/10

 

I’d like to thank all of you for sticking with me throughout the Music Yearbook project. It means a lot to me, and I’m so thankful to 605 Magazine for the opportunity to write on a subject that I love so dearly. Hopefully, you’ll be reading my stuff in a lot of other cool places in the future!

Thanks for reading!

 

Related:

Meet the Interns: Sean Calhoun 

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 1996

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 1997 

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 1998

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 1999

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2000

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2001

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2002

06 2017

Interviews with South Dakotans finding success outside their college major by Kyle Hallberg.

Images submitted

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Flashback to freshman year of college, the first weekend in a strange dorm, in an even stranger town. This is when I first met Rebecca Beu, a quirky health nut from Rapid City. Little did I know, this health nut would someday make a living out of being healthy, but not in the way you think.

Between transferring schools, finding her place in the college world and attempting to maintain long distance relationships, Beu and I sat down to talk about her journey through yoga, and how it has drastically changed her life.

Kyle Hallberg: When did you first get into yoga?

Rebecca Beu: It was my sophomore year of college, so two years this September. I transferred from the University of South Dakota to Chadron State College and saw a flyer for the class and decided to try it out.

KH: That must have been a little weird switching schools so early in your college career. Did you keep the same major?

RB: I started my freshman year at USD as an Addictions Counseling major. I decided to go to Chadron and switched to Criminal Justice, and then I switched halfway through that semester to Psychology. My junior year I continued with Psychology, corresponding online while I lived in Rapid City. I added a nutrition minor and am currently finishing out my senior year. I’ll be graduating in December.

KH: So it looks like you’ve always been interested in health or public service of some sort. Did you add the nutrition after you started yoga?

RB: Yes. My sophomore year was kind of difficult for me, since I didn’t have much of a friend group in Chadron. I spent roughly three hours every day working out and I started obsessing about what I ate. So when I started going to yoga, is was for a workout but it eventually helped me find a better connection with food – which is when I decided I wanted to learn more about nutrition.

KH: That’s so cool how you expected to get one thing out of yoga, and it ended up changing your entire perspective. Can you talk to me about your decision/path from starting yoga to getting certified?

RB: I loved doing yoga and would try to discover things on my own at home. I started going to The Yoga Studio in Rapid City and fell in love with the teachers and the atmosphere. The teacher I had in Chadron was also very encouraging. Once I left Chadron, the yoga studio was my social environment. They were offering a teacher training last fall and I played with the idea of certifying, but was a little hesitant since I’d only been practicing for barely a year. I started to study more about yoga and Sanskrit, so I would feel sure of my place in the training. That specific training ended up getting cancelled, but they decided to offer the training this summer/fall season. This time I was sure I wanted to be apart of it, because I wanted to share what yoga was and is for me. In a way, it was good for it to be postponed a year, as I gained confidence and learned so much about myself over that time.

KH: So you have really put a lot of time and effort into making this a reality. Talk to me about the balance yoga and everything else. Is it ever difficult?

RB: The balance between work and yoga is definitely more difficult than that between yoga and school. I have certain classes and times I like going to, and I try to make my availability work around those classes, but that doesn’t always work. I have no problems studying for school, so that’s pretty easy. As far as yoga goes, I really enjoy studying yoga, so that’s never a problem.

KH: You seem to have figured out a way to keep studying interesting, and having something like a yoga class to look forward to has got to help. Do you have any specific plans for after graduation in December?

RB: Well, hopefully sometime during this semester I will start a plant based cooking program, which is six months long. Then after I graduate I plan on getting my health coach certification, which is also six months long. My plan is to then teach yoga and be a health coach, and ideally some day I’d like to own my own studio.

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Related:

Locally Grown: Mari Ibis

Locally Grown: Ben Gertner

Meet the Interns: Kyle Hallberg

Locally Grown: Mato Jacob Standing Soldier

Locally Grown: Tevyn Waddell

Locally Grown: Kyle West

Locally Grown: Addison Avery

Locally Grown: Cassia McLoon

05 2017

Dining In and Out: Pappy’s the Original

One young foodie explores the local restaurant scene, bringing quality cuisine into your kitchen, sans doggie bag.

By Kaylyn Deiter

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Dining Out

Housed alongside a bank in a modern brick building called The Plaza downtown, Pappy’s the Original is a refreshing take on the classic, homegrown coffee shop.

Owned by husband and wife team, Chris and Jessica Pappas, Pappy’s is a shop that serves up traditional staples like pizza, breakfast sandwiches and smoothies all made in-house. But that commitment to tradition isn’t to say that Pappy’s is stuck in the past.

What the owners call the “ultimate Greek yogurt bar” is the centerpiece of the eatery, featuring a plethora of Greek yogurt parfaits perfect for those with a sweet tooth or customers who crave something a bit more savory. High-top tables dot the interior, while a wall of windows and light up letters that spell out “Pappy’s” give one of Sioux Falls’ newest coffee shops a big city vibe.

“The owners really want to give people a coffee shop with healthy food options,” general manager Ryan Birckner said. “We serve a little bit of everything here, from pizza and smoothies to yogurt and salads, plus breakfast all day long.”

Pappy’s is a bit different than your typical coffee shop though, and for this downtown spot that’s not a bad thing. Patrons gravitate toward Greek yogurt and breakfast sandwiches during the early morning hours, while lunch can produce a crowd craving Pappy’s pizzas, salads and wraps. I’ve found myself hanging out there in the late afternoon, sipping on an Almond Be Joyful smoothie in the presence of other patrons hidden behind laptops and buried in books.

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And that’s how Pappy’s is able to stand out in a city filled with coffee shops, bars and restaurants—it dares to do things differently. Pappy’s isn’t completely committed to coffee, doesn’t advertise an expansive beverage list or serve course upon course of dinner entrees, but that’s where Pappy’s shines, it’s an eclectic mix of the best of all three.

“We really appreciate everyone who comes in here and we want them to feel that way,” Brickner said. “Essentially we just want people to leave happy and feel special.”

Three reasons to eat at Pappy’s:

  1. Delicious smoothies
  2. Light and healthy breakfast options
  3. Plenty of outlets for those doing homework

Dining In

Taking that Pappy’s breakfast home is as easy as making your own granola and adding in some Greek yogurt and seasonal fruit. Spice things up by enjoying your treat out of a mason jar and you’ve got one cute and healthy start to the day.

Ingredients:

  • granola:
    • ¼ cup water
    • ¾ cup brown sugar
    • ½ cup butter
    • ¼ cup honey
    • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 3 cups oatmeal
    • ½ wheat germ
    • 1 cup slivered almonds
    • 1 cup or more raisins
    • 1 cup flaked coconut (optional)
    • 1 cup salted peanuts
    • 1 cup peeled sunflower seeds
  • Parfait:
    • Bananas
    • Vanilla or plain Greek yogurt
    • Blueberries

Instructions:

  1. Microwave first 6 ingredients for 5 minutes, stirring often
  2. Pour liquid ingredients over dry ingredients and microwave all together for 9 minutes, stirring every 3 minutes (add raisins in only during the last 3 minutes)
  3. Spread mixture out on wax paper or tinfoil to cool
  4. After granola has cooled, layer yogurt, granola and fruit in a dish of your choice

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Photo courtesy of Kaylyn Deiter

This parfait was light and refreshing, just what I needed after a day spent outdoors. Eat it as a snack with fruit, or sub in some strawberries and chocolate and you’re good to go for dessert.

Three reasons to enjoy Pappy’s at home:

  1. Homemade granola makes a quick and healthy snack
  2. Mix it up with different fruits and flavors
  3. This recipe makes a large batch, keeping you in granola for a week at least

Pappy’s isn’t just another Sioux Falls coffee shop—with its extensive menu, traditional Greek yogurt and South Dakota brewed coffee, this is one downtown spot you won’t want to pass up. Take that Pappy’s spirit home with our simple granola recipe and enjoy parfaits from the comfort of your couch.

 

Related:

Dining In and Out: Crawford’s Bar & Grill

Dining In and Out: Crave

Dining In and Out: Oh My Cupcakes

Dining In and Out: Fiero Pizza

Dining In and Out: Phillips Avenue Diner

Dining In and Out: Mama’s Ladas

Dining In and Out: Ode to Food and Drinks

Web Extra: Ode’s Dirty Arnold

Meet the Interns Kaylyn Deiter 
 

05 2017

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2006

By Sean Calhoun

While I’ve covered a lot of different genres on this blog, one that I’ve avoided up to this point is country music (partly because I was interested in other bands, and partly because I’ve never been a country fan). That changes this week, as I kick off my 2006 entry with…

Me And My Gang – Rascal Flatts

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I haven’t regularly listened to country music since elementary school. Even then, it wasn’t a conscious choice – my bus driver would always have the radio tuned to what was then KTWB 101.9 Sioux Falls, so that’s what I heard. Between those bus rides and the release of Disney’s Cars in 2006, I remember hearing a lot of Rascal Flatts over my last couple of years of elementary school.

Specifically, I heard “What Hurts The Most” – over and over and over again. It was an absolute smash hit on country radio upon the release of this album. I think that, at least for a while, I was a fan of the song. It’s got a reasonably heartfelt vocal performance and it’s really not that bad musically.

Even though I’m not a country music fan, I was rather excited to take a trip down memory lane with this particular album – the title track is another one that I heard several times on the way to and from school, and a couple of other tracks jogged my memory too. Unfortunately, a couple of tracks in, I started to realize something – almost all of these tracks basically sound the same.

Perhaps symptomatic of pop-country as a whole around the middle of the decade, pretty much everything on Me And My Gang is heavily formulaic. The tracks are basically pop songs – some ballads, some pump-up tracks, some inspirational numbers – with some “countrified” instrumentation and a few loose lyrical references to “good old boys” and those types of things. Switch out Gary LeVox for one of any number of pop vocalists of the era, and I’m not sure that the album would be all that different than what Rascal Flatts ended up with (outside of the removal of a little bit of admittedly enjoyable Southern drawl).

I wish I could take more positives out of this album – I really do – but there’s just not a lot of substance here. LeVox does an admirable job, and the instrumentation is competent if not particularly inspired, but it’s really not enough to overcome the homogeneity of the production and the content.

Score, Adjusted for 2017 Ratings Inflation: 4.7/10

 

I’ve listened to a lot of pop-punk over the last few years, and it’s gotten me into other genres as well – emo, post-hardcore, and even some metal. The next album up for 2006 is one of those albums that exists in a bit of a transitional state between all three of these genres…

Decemberunderground – AFI

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I’ve always enjoyed the bands on the heavier side of pop-punk and emo, including acts that could occasionally cross over into harder genres like post-hardcore and screamo. My Chemical Romance, Hawthorne Heights, and other similar bands have been a staple of my Spotify history for years now.

Decemberunderground is, onstensibly, another genre that falls into this “in-between” space. Musically, AFI sounds like a mix between MCR and early Silverstein here, which would seem to fall cleanly into my sphere of enjoyment.

There’s a slight problem here, though, and it’s a balance that’s difficult for acts like this to properly strike – the border between self-seriousness and self-parody. A band like My Chemical Romance, while dealing with heavy subject matter, understood that moments of levity were necessary to balance out the angst, and that’s a key component that AFI misses here.

This album takes itself very seriously. Davey Havok’s lyrics and vocals are, more or less, devoid of humor, which makes the music significantly darker than it has to be. It almost comes across as a parody of the genre at times (as did Havok’s personal visual aesthetic at the time – see his hair and outfit in the “Miss Murder” video) and, paradoxically, makes the album far more difficult to take seriously.

On a more positive note, it’s a pretty musically proficient album. The guitar and percussion work is solid, as is Havok’s voice, apart from the occasional “dark” affectation that he tries to put on (which just makes him sound kind of ridiculous). “Miss Murder,” the album’s big single, is a defining song of the mid-2000s theatrical emo scene (maybe not quite to the degree of something like “Welcome To The Black Parade,” but not too far off either).

If it seems like I’m bringing My Chemical Romance up a bit too often in this review, it’s because they serve as a reminder of what AFI could have been here. Havok basically sounds like a humorless, C+ version of Gerard Way, and while there are a lot of musical similarities, there’s just a certain disappointing flatness present throughout Decemberunderground.

Score, Adjusted for 2017 Ratings Inflation: 5.0/10

 

Related:

Meet the Interns: Sean Calhoun 

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 1996

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 1997 

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 1998

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 1999

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2000

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2001

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2002

05 2017

Interviews with South Dakotans finding success outside their college major by Kyle Hallberg.

Images submitted

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Throughout my journey with 605, I’ve delved deep into the music scene of Sioux Falls. While I have met my fair share of bands, singer-songwriters and producers, none were quite like the band made up by Adel Toay, Donny Minor and Zane Lodmell. Also known as Remember To Breathe, this band has been through the ringer and back, and all for one common goal: revive pop punk. Between school, jobs, relationships and life in general, the band has found a way to keep things going, thriving when everything else felt still.

Kind enough to let me into their personal world of recording, the band invited me to their studio and sit down and talk about things from the beginning, to the now, and what there is to come.

Kyle Hallberg: So, how did this happen?

Adel Toay: My junior year of high school I decided I wanted to make a record and it was originally acoustic, solo stuff. Then I wanted to move it more towards studio, band work. The band itself took a bit of a hiatus when I went to the Art Institute of Los Angeles, which is where I lived for a year. I realized that wasn’t what I really wanted to do. At that time, there were only two members of the band. So when I got back, we got the ball rolling on our recovery EP, which is when John left and Zane came in. So that’s how that part happened.

KH: What about Donny?

AT: We actually found each other on Craigslist! It was much less of an audition and more of an invitation. Which also led to Zane, who happened to be living with Donny, so it just made sense for him to be in the band, especially because we were in desperate need of a drummer.

KH: Wow, that’s quite the unconventional approach to acquiring a full band. So after you had a band, a new EP and a release show, where do you go from there?

AT: Well we knew that we wanted to have something out within a year of the EP, and we each kept bringing our own things to the table. We actually started this album before the EP was released, so things kind of just kept going at a natural pace. We were pumping out songs and playing a crazy amount of shows, which we could never seem to get enough of. But, what really launched this album was our recent signing with Loud, Broke and Dumb Records here in Sioux Falls. We plan on taking it to Minneapolis in the end, but it is just a cool thing to be recording in Sioux Falls, where everything started and all of our fans discovered us.

KH: Not that you don’t already seem busy enough, but besides shows, recording and signing, what else happens in your lives? What about school?

Donny Minor: Well I go to USF for Theatre, which has always been in my life. I have dabbled with the idea of teaching, but the thing with that is music has always been number one, and I kind of look at theatre as my fall back, teaching or not.

Zane Lodmell: I am not currently going to school. I went to USF for two years for Youth Ministry and Theology, where I discovered that was something I really didn’t want to do. My plan is to get my degree in some sort of music production.

KH: You guys seem to have juggling down to an art, and the decision to stay, leave and go back to school can be a rough one, but your calm demeanor lets me think the band is number one right now. Do you think your fans see it that way too? Will this album keep that up?

DM: I’m really stoked for this new album, I think it will shift people’s outlook on what kind of band we are. If we had to describe our album, it would be this: If pop punk is dead, we are a band of witch doctors trying to revive it. We have had people come up to us and tell us that they can hear a change in our sound, a good change. It’s awesome to have people come up to us at shows and say we’ve gotten better and grown as a band. Honestly, that’s why we do this. We love writing and recording, but the shows are the reason we are still doing this. The fan base we have built in Sioux Falls is incredible; and while it is small, they are true fans. It’s a crazy feeling to be doing a show and look out and see people in the audience singing along to one of the songs you’ve written.

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KH: That’s really cool. I don’t want to say groupies, but I feel like that is the ultimate goal, to have people follow you from album to album, to be able to build a consistent sound that keeps people around.

ZL: Definitely. The best compliment we’ve ever had is a girl say she is excited for our new album. Hearing that was insane. Hopefully when we are able to expand out of South Dakota and take this album on tour, we will be able to build an even bigger fan base.

KH: I find it super interesting that you guys are really best friends and that you have such a personal relationship with the audience and your fans. Do you guys ever feel like there is a certain kind of pressure between school, friends and the band?

AT: Yes and no. I think that is only ever feels like a burden because we know we can’t not do it- And while we have met some of our best friends in college, the people we meet at shows are able to forget about their problems and all of the negativity just falls away. We feel that with the bands we meet, too. The music community in Sioux Falls is so welcoming and everyone just wants to have fun and make music. But, in the end, we are honestly so lucky to have found each other. After everything that this band has been through, to come out with these people is amazing.

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04 2017

605 Outdoor Wonders: Good Earth State Park

By Anna Strictecky

Images courtesy of South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks

As far as natural beauty goes, Good Earth State Park stays true to its name with some of the most luscious greenery and landscapes that South Dakota has to offer. As we take a look at our next destination, we see a phenomenal natural beauty with a river that flows through and trees higher than the eye can see.

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Good Earth State Park at Blood Run, southeast of Sioux Falls, is a national historic landmark, mainly recognized for its history as a settlement for thousands of Native Americans. The landscape along the Big Sioux River allowed the area to be very habitable, and much of the landscape remains today. It derives its name from a late 17th century Oneota Culture Indian Village complex that covered up to 3,000 acres spanning both sides of the Big Sioux River.

This is one of the oldest sites of long-term human habitation in the United States. The river, abundant wildlife, fertile flood plains, availability of pipestone (catlinite) and protection from winds made the area an important gathering place for seasonal ceremonies and a significant trading center for many tribal peoples from 1500 – 1700 A.D. By 1720, Blood Run was abandoned and remnants of this significant archaeological site were nearly forgotten. Blood Run is the largest Oneota cultural site discovered to date in the upper Midwest.  

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Even though Good Earth doesn’t have an excess of different activities for one to do, the best part about it is being able to absorb all of the nature that surrounds. As I hiked around Good Earth, it gave me a chance to truly just walk around without the different tourist activities. Other than seeing a couple of visitors that were kayaking on the river, everybody else there was just soaking up the sun and the beauty of the state park around them. That, is why Good Earth state park tops my list of genuinely natural South Dakota beauties.

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04 2017

THE (MUSIC) YEARBOOK: 2005

By Sean Calhoun

Last time around, I promised you more pop-punk. Well, this entry’s first album is one of the most successful albums in the genre’s history, by one of its most successful acts. It’s time to talk about…

American Idiot – Green Day

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There’s no denying that American Idiot was an almost absurdly successful album. It launched Green Day back into mainstream relevance for the first time in about a decade, generated a healthy amount of controversy due to its overtly political content, and was even adapted into a successful stage musical that continues to tour.

It’s a pretty darn good pop-punk album, too. American Idiot is either Green Day’s best or second-best album (depending on your feelings toward 1994’s Dookie) and one of the best and most thorough pop-punk albums ever made.

Frontman Billie Joe Armstrong is perhaps at his strongest on this album, delivering many of his vocal lines with just the right amount of righteous anger – enough to get the point across, but not so much that he becomes a parody of himself. He’s also not afraid to get more personal and less angry, as when he sings a memorial to his deceased father on “Wake Me Up When September Ends”.

While American Idiot ostensibly functions as a concept album about Bush-era America (and indeed, there’s enough of a story to the album to make the aforementioned musical make sense), its thirteen tracks function well on their own, especially singles “American Idiot,” “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” and the aforementioned “September,” the latter two of which are, at worst, two of the five biggest songs of Green Day’s career.

Perhaps the best track on the album, however, is “Jesus Of Suburbia,” a sprawling, nine-minute epic that solidifies much of the story of the album. With its multiple melodic and thematic twists and turns, it practically functions as the band’s “Bohemian Rhapsody,” with the bonus of contributing to a larger, overarching story. Armstrong carries a good deal of the song, but the hard-pushing accompaniment of Mike Dirnt on bass and Tre Cool on drums contributes a lot as well. The two halves of “Jesus” almost function as two completely separate songs, but there’s just enough hanging between them to allow the track to function as a cohesive whole.

The band is able to keep it up for the album’s full running time. There’s a lot of creativity, both musically and lyrically, on display here. “St. Jimmy,” a fast-charging punk number, and “She’s A Rebel” are also significant highlights, and the album closes with “Whatsername,” another excellent track and a fitting conclusion to the record.

An interesting coda – American Idiot only came into being because the master tapes for the album Green Day was intending to release – titled Cigarettes and Valentines – were stolen from the studio. While it would have been interesting to hear what the band had produced outside of the confines of the final record’s conceptual format, I think that it’s for the better that American Idiot – a bona fide pop-punk classic – was the final result.

Score, Adjusted for 2017 Ratings Inflation: 8.7/10

 

The next album for this year is by a band that has been a massive worldwide success for years. However, over that same time, they’ve had a very difficult time shaking off their reputation as a “boring” and “safe” band. No matter your opinion on the group, there’s no denying the success of…

X&Y – Coldplay

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I won’t deny that I’ve fallen into some of the easy Coldplay-hate tropes since I first heard their music. It’s easy to see them as a boring, lowest-common-denominator pop-rock group, especially when compared to acts like Muse and Radiohead.

However, I’ve grown to realize that this is a pretty unfair characterization of Coldplay. Chris Martin and company are talented musicians with a solid knack for spacious and accessible pop-rock songs, and X&Y is actually one of the standouts in the group’s discography.

The perfectionism of Coldplay as a group is apparent throughout X&Y. Every piece of every song snaps together in almost mechanical fashion, with nary a misplaced or unnecessary note. The music manages to be both spacious and economical, both easy to listen to and rewarding to a more discerning listener. It skirts the “boring” label by being impeccably performed and produced – even the more repetitive and uninspired bits sound pretty musically excellent.

As a former piano player, I’ve always appreciated Coldplay’s extensive use of the instrument. There’s quite a bit of piano peppered throughout this record, perhaps most memorably on hit single “Speed of Sound”, one of the best tracks on the album. Beyond simply the keys, the instrumentation on X&Y, which borders on electronic at times, is solid and accompanies Martin’s crisp voice and fluttering falsetto quite well.

Coldplay’s music may be somewhat unremarkable when compared to similar acts, but there’s a quality of sharpness and maturity that generally manages to set it apart. There are certainly moments on this album where Martin and the rest of the band sound pedestrian and less than exciting, but they never dive downward into banality or amateurism. It’s a professional album, and it sounds very musically good.

Perhaps the album’s most significant weakness – even then, not nearly as significant as it could be – is Martin’s lyricism. Too often, he resorts to empty platitudes or uninspired metaphors, and he has a tendency to fall thematically flat more often than the rest of the band. (At the very least, even his most uncreative lyrics are, for the most part, well-delivered.)

I can understand the typecasting of the group as “boring”, seeing as it’s a line of thinking I’ve often indulged in myself. However, if nothing else, X&Y is an album that deserves an open-minded listen – it just may have a couple of surprises in store.

Score, Adjusted for 2017 Ratings Inflation: 7.7/10

 

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04 2017

Dining In and Out: Grille 26

One young foodie explores the local restaurant scene, bringing quality cuisine into your kitchen, sans doggie bag.

By Kaylyn Deiter

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Dining Out

Though its name speaks to its location on 26th and Western, Grille 26 is more than just a number in the Sioux Falls restaurant scene. Owned by the same company that runs Minerva’s, Grille 26 serves up home-style food with a professional flair. It’s a neighborhood restaurant with a decidedly metropolitan atmosphere.

“The general feeling we want to give people is that of a neighborhood place,” dining room manager Ryan Van Roekel said. “We’re more business casual, but we do have a really eclectic menu that people love for special occasions.”

One of the best things about Grille 26 is its commitment to quality—this is high end food minus the snobbish attitude that so often accompanies that mindset. It’s a restaurant built on passion and primed to serve anyone who walks through its double doors. Grille 26 is truly a neighborhood gathering place with hospitality at its core.

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Photo courtesy of onlyinyourstate.com

Speaking of doors, the ones that open into Grille 26 reveal an airy floor plan steeped in a soft golden glow, courtesy of both the lights and wooden accents. Pops of green complement the brightly lit interior, while a well-stocked bar area gives way to more intimate seating in the form of booths and small tables. It’s contemporary while still remaining cozy.

“The reputation of Grille is one of celebration,” Van Roekel said. “We want people to have a really good sit-down meal and the overall energy to be really happy and enjoyable for them.”

And we haven’t even gotten to the food yet. Grille 26 preserves that Minerva’s-style quality while making high-end dining accessible for the masses. What I mean is, yes, they serve mac & cheese, but this isn’t your typical box of Kraft (though I do love some good Kraft mac & cheese). Instead Grille 26’s mac & cheese is a combination of three different pastas, all made in house, mixed with a heavenly blend of white cheddar, fontina and gorgonzola cheese. It’s an upscale spin on a classic, something this restaurant does like no other.

 

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(Photo courtesy of grille26.com)

More high quality options litter the menu, from the famous honey almond chicken penne and brick oven salmon to the NY strip Michael and creme brulee, but its Grille 26’s commitment to quality service that pushes this neighborhood favorite over the top.

“From special occasions to just going out to eat with friends, our restaurant is all about making sure people have a great time, that they really enjoy their experience,” Van Roekel said. “It’s a welcoming atmosphere that people want to come back to again and again.”

Three reasons to eat at Grille 26:

  1. Homey atmosphere
  2. Diverse menu
  3. Excellent service

Dining In

Though Grille 26 is known for its hospitality, what’s more hospitable than your own home? Try out this simple roasted potatoes recipe courtesy of Jana Hurley, of Aberdeen. It’s the perfect side dish for your next steak dinner a la Grille 26.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ lb new potatoes, cut into quarters
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • Pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees
  2. Place potatoes in a mixing bowl
  3. Sprinkle on salt and pepper
  4. Add olive oil, rosemary and garlic
  5. Toss until potatoes are well coated
  6. Spread potatoes out on a baking pan
  7. Roast for 40 minutes or until potatoes are browned

Once they were done, we enjoyed these roasted potatoes along with steaks and fresh green beans. A restaurant-quality meal that won’t break the bank.

Three reasons to enjoy Grille 26 at home:

  1. Avoid the battle to find a parking spot.
  2. Feel accomplished by conquering steak on your own.
  3. Avoid the temptation of one of Grille’s delectable desserts.

Neighborhood friendliness is a major selling point for Grille 26, as is homestyle food with a high-end flair. Take one of their best dishes home by cooking up some steak, potatoes and veggies. This is one dinner you’ll want to share with everyone.

 

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04 2017

Locally Grown: Dennis (DJ) Smith

Interviews with South Dakotans finding success outside their college major by Kyle Hallberg.

Images submitted

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Growing up in a three generation home, playing football and soccer, and being avidly devoted to Boy Scouts, Dennis (DJ) Smith had a full schedule to keep up with. If that wasn’t enough, Smith ended his senior year with a gold medal at the national FCCLA gathering. By creating and implementing a project called “Doing More Than Writing Love On Your Arms”, based on the pay it forward theory, Smith was able to give some insight on suicide prevention, starting the national program known as Lost and Found, which was later picked up at the University of South Dakota.

Smith went on to join the Peace Corps, which is where things get even more interesting. Smith and I sat down to talk about his life after the FCCLA win, which was as full, if not more, of adventure, accomplishment and discovery.

Kyle Hallberg: After such a diverse high school experience, what did you do when you started college?

DJ Smith: When I first started as USD, I was double majoring in Theatre and Political Science. After finding out I would have had to do two completely separate degrees, I ended up switching to a double major in Political Science and English, which was okay since I was still able to take Shakespeare classes.

KH: At least you got to keep those theatre-esque classes. Is that when you decided peace corps?

DS: Have you ever read Perks of Being A Wallflower? There is one sentence in that book that talks about joining the peace corps – which started my two day binge on researching everything there is to know about the peace corps during my senior year of high school. Then in college, everything I worked on was to move me towards the peace corps.

KH: So, your interest was sparked in high school, and grew in college?

DS: Actually, one of my buddies had just gotten back from a tour in Afghanistan and we went out for drinks, which is where he convinced me to get up and actually do it, to join the Peace Corps. So I went home at 2 a.m. to apply, got an interview a week later, got nominated, and was appointed to Peace Corps Tanzania. I was extra excited because the Tanzania post was actually the first Peace Corps post set up by JFK.

KH: Wow, that’s a lot to happen while still going to school. What happens after you get appointed?

DS: After I was appointed, I spent the next year going to medical checkups and doing everything you need to do to go to a different country. In February of 2015, we flew to Pennsylvania, then to Tanzania where we met everyone and started our journey. Then, the next 8 weeks were spent doing language training, where we were immersed in Swahili.

About 5 weeks in, we were given our assignments and I was placed in the southern village of Mtambula. I was in the Health/Agriculture cohort, so I worked for three months to get to know my village and not early terminate. My friends, we were called the Goon Squad, spent every weekend together, and we were on our way to a lake when one of our friends was killed in a car accident. The Goon Squad was hit hard, and we were somewhat expected to early terminate, which none of us did. We wanted to do it for Robby.”

KH: I can’t even imagine going to through all of that, and still deciding to stay the full term. I’m sure it was difficult to go back to a somewhat normal life.

DS: Yeah it was hard. We all went back to our villages to continue to cope, which is where things get interesting. Each cohort has their own Facebook page to help each other out, which is where I found the love of my life. We started talking and I just knew things could only go up from here. So the next year of my life was spent doing projects in my village and being with Ben. We would try to see each other at least every other month, which was especially hard in a country where being gay is illegal. But, we made it work and we are doing exceptionally well.

Back in my village, I worked with mothers with HIV, built new water sources for the maternity wards to keep moms and new babies healthy year round. We were also in the process of building twelve wells in our village, which is based on a 12-week rotation to ensure the wells last longer. I was able to teach about gender equality, sex education and the LGBT community as well.

KH: That sounds absolutely incredible. I can’t believe that all of that was over the course of a year. Obviously you are home, so did your term end?

DS: Well, that’s where things get a little fun. It was during one of my LGBT training classes that I noticed my pupils were different sizes. The onsite doctor attributed it to my life-long battle with migraines, but suggested an MRI just to be safe. Another doctor came in and told me I had to go to South Africa to have a follow up MRI, which is when I found out I had a brain tumor.

KH: That had to have been quite the shock, especially since you were in a different country.

DS: Right. So I flew back to America, had a bunch of tests done, had a biopsy and discovered I had a grade two astrocytoma brain tumor in mid-June. Matter of fact, the pupil dilation had nothing to do with the tumor, but ended up being from my migraines. I was told that the chances of finding a brain tumor of grade two status is under 2.5%. Finding my tumor was by complete chance, we were beyond lucky. Ben came back to be with me during the biopsy, which was fantastic. After the biopsy, I had brain surgery on July 28th. They are pretty sure they got it all out, but I will go back for another MRI to double check before I fly back to Tanzania. Dr. Asfora saved my life, he is an excellent doctor and a really amazing person.

KH: Wow. How are you feeling? What is next?

DS: My memory is a little foggy, which will improve over time. Otherwise, I am doing really well. I miss Ben and my dog, but I also miss my village and the work I’m doing in Tanzania. I’m so excited to go back and resume my life in the Peace Corps. I have so much left to accomplish in my life, that I never had the time to think there was a chance the tumor would win.

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